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Efficacy of home-based physical activity interventions in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Sieczkowska, SM, Smaira, FI, Mazzolani, BC, Gualano, B, Roschel, H and Peçanha, T (2021) Efficacy of home-based physical activity interventions in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism, 51 (3). pp. 576-587. ISSN 0049-0172

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Abstract

Introduction: Physical activity (PA) has been receiving increasing interest in recent years as an adjuvant therapy for autoimmune rheumatic disease (ARDs), but there is scarce information about the efficacy of home-based PA for patients with ARDs. Objective: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the efficacy of home-based physical activity (PA) interventions in improving health-related quality of life, functional capacity, pain, and disease activity in patients with ARDs. Methods: Searches were performed in PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Cochrane, CINAHL database and Sport Discus. Trials were considered eligible if they included a home-based physical activity intervention. The population included adults with autoimmune rheumatic diseases (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, systemic sclerosis and ankylosing spondylitis), comparisons included non-physical activity control or centre-based interventions (i.e., interventions performed on a specialized exercise centre) and the outcomes were quality of life, pain, functional capacity, disease activity and inflammation. Results: Home-based physical activity improved quality of life (p<0.01; g = 0.69; IC95%, 0.61 to 1.07) and functional capacity (p = 0.04; g = - 0.51; IC95%, -0.86; -0.16), and reduced disease activity (p = 0.03; g = - 0.60; IC95%, -1.16; -0.04) and pain (p = 0.01; g = -1.62; IC95%, -2.94 to -0.31) compared to the non-physical activity control condition. Additionally, home-based physical activity interventions were as effective as centre-based interventions for all investigated outcomes. Conclusion: Home-based PA is an efficacious strategy to improve disease control and aleviate symptoms in ARD.

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