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    Numerical simulation of water impact of solid bodies with vertical and oblique entries

    Gu, HB, Qian, L, Causon, DM, Mingham, CG and Lin, P (2013) Numerical simulation of water impact of solid bodies with vertical and oblique entries. Ocean Engineering, 75. ISSN 0029-8018

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    Abstract

    The flow problem of hydrodynamic impact during water entry of solid objects of various shapes and configurations is simulated by a two-fluid free surface code based on the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations (NSE) on a fixed Cartesian grid. In the numerical model the free surface is captured by the level set function, and the partial cell method combined with a local relative velocity approach is applied to the simulation of moving bodies. The code is firstly validated using experimental data and other numerical results in terms of the impact forces and surface pressure distributions for the vertical entry of a semi-circular cylinder and a symmetric wedge. Then configurations of oblique water entry of a wedge are simulated and the predicted free surface profiles during impact are compared with experimental results showing a good agreement. Finally, a series of tests involving vertical and oblique water entry of wedges with different heel angles are simulated and the results compared with published numerical results. It is found that the surface pressure distributions and forces predicted by the present model generally agree very well with other numerical results based on the potential flow theory. However, as the current model is based on the solution of the NSE, it is more robust and can therefore predict, for example, the formation and separation of the thin flow jets (spray) from surface of the wedge and associated ventilation phenomena for the cases of oblique water entry when the horizontal velocity is dominant. It is also noted that the potential flow theory can result in over-estimated negative pressures at the tip of the wedge due to its inherent restriction to nonseparated flows. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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