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    Effect of a slump posture on pain, proprioception, and electrical activity of the muscles in office workers with chronic non-specific neck pain. A retrospective study

    Cheragh, Zahra Ataei, Degens, Hans ORCID logoORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7399-4841 and Sakinepoor, Ainollah ORCID logoORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4008-562X (2024) Effect of a slump posture on pain, proprioception, and electrical activity of the muscles in office workers with chronic non-specific neck pain. A retrospective study. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, 38. pp. 100-105. ISSN 1360-8592

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    Abstract

    Background: The impact of computer typing in a slump posture on pain, proprioception and muscle recruitment has not been extensively investigated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent of pain, proprioception and muscle activity resulting from computer typing in a slump posture in women who already suffer from chronic neck pain. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted between May 20 to July 10, 2021. A total of 15 female 42-(±4.96)-year-old office workers with chronic non-specific neck pain participated in this study. Before and after 60 min of computer typing in a slump posture, proprioception and pain were measured using an inclinometer and visual analog scale (VAS), respectively. The activity of the cervical erector spine (CES) and upper trapezius (UT) muscle was also measured before and after the slump-posture computer typing, in upright, forward, and slump postures. Resu: lts: Paired-samples t-tests showed that pain was increased and proprioception in all directions (flexion, extension, right and left lateral flexion, and right, and left rotation) was less accurate (P < 0.05) after 60 min computer typing. The CES and UT muscle activity were elevated more in the forward head and slump posture than in the upright posture (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Sixty minutes computer typing in a slump posture increased neck pain, resulted in a decreased proprioception in the neck and was accompanied by an increased activity of the neck musculature.

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