e-space
Manchester Metropolitan University's Research Repository

    Psychosocial correlates of pain intensity and neck disability index among people with non-specific neck pain in a low-resource setting: a cross-sectional study

    Odole, AC, Alegbeleye, OA, Ekediegwu, EC, Onyeso, OK, Mbada, CE and Akosile, CO (2022) Psychosocial correlates of pain intensity and neck disability index among people with non-specific neck pain in a low-resource setting: a cross-sectional study. European Journal of Physiotherapy. ISSN 2167-9169

    [img]
    Preview
    Accepted Version
    Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

    Download (422kB) | Preview

    Abstract

    Background: Psychosocial factors such as pain catastrophising (PC), kinesiophobia, and pain self-efficacy (PSE) complicate disease burden among people with chronic pain and disability. Purpose: To investigate the psychosocial correlates of neck pain intensity and disability among Nigerians with non-specific neck pain (NSNP). Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of Nigerians with NSNP through hospitals-based consecutive sampling. Numeric Pain Rating Scale and the Neck Disability Index questionnaire were used to assess participants’ pain intensity (PI) and neck disability (ND), respectively. Kinesiophobia, PC, and PSE were assessed using Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK), Pain Catastrophising Scale, and Pain Self-efficacy Questionnaire, respectively. Data analyses were completed using descriptive statistics, independent samples t-test, Pearson’s correlation coefficient, and multiple linear regression at p ≤ 0.05. Results: Participants were (24 males, 48 females) aged 51.56 ± 14.31 years. The average PI (5.28 ± 1.80) and ND (35.03 ± 17.85) were moderate. There were significant correlations between PC and PI (r = 0.350, p = 0.003), and ND (r = 0.339, p = 0.004); kinesiophobia and ND (r = 0.314, p = 0.007); and PSE and ND (r = − 0.561, p < 0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that PC (β = 0.270, p = 0.026) and ND (β = 0.494, p = 0.001) significantly predicts PI, while age (β = 0.197, p = 0.038), PI (β = 0.344, p = 0.001), and PSE (β= −0.474, p < 0.001) predicts ND. There were no statistically significant gender differences in PC, kinesiophobia and PSE. Conclusion: Non-specific neck pain and ND correlates with psychosocial factors such as PC and PSE, respectively. There were no gendered differences in psychosocial responses to NSNP, however, older individuals tend to have more severe ND. Assessment of age and psychosocial factors should be included in management of NSNP.

    Impact and Reach

    Statistics

    Activity Overview
    6 month trend
    32Downloads
    6 month trend
    25Hits

    Additional statistics for this dataset are available via IRStats2.

    Altmetric

    Repository staff only

    Edit record Edit record