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    Comparative effectiveness of two stabilization exercise positions on pain and functional disability of patients with low back pain

    Ojoawo, Adesola Ojo, Hassan, Mulikat Abiola, Olaogun, Matthew Olatokunbo B, Johnson, Esther Olubusola and Mbada, Chidozie Emmanuel (2017) Comparative effectiveness of two stabilization exercise positions on pain and functional disability of patients with low back pain. Journal of Exercise Rehabilitation, 13 (3). pp. 363-371. ISSN 2288-176X

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    Abstract

    The study investigated the effects of two stabilization exercise positions (prone and supine) on pain intensity (PI) and functional disability (FD) of patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP). The 56 sub-jects that completed the study were randomly assigned into stabiliza-tion in prone (SIP) (n=19), stabilization in supine (SIS) (n=20), and prone and supine (SIPS) position (n=17) groups. Subjects in all the groups re-ceived infrared radiation for 15 min and kneading massage at the low back region. Subjects in SIP, SIS, and SIPS groups received stabilization exercise in prone lying, supine lying and combination of both positions respectively. Treatment was applied twice weekly for eight weeks. PI and FD level of each subject were measured at baseline, 4th and 8th week of the treatment sessions. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The alpha level was set at P < 0.05. With-in-group comparison indicated that PI and FD at the 4th and 8th week were significantly reduced (P < 0.001) when compared with baseline in all the three groups. However, the result showed that there was no sig-nificant difference in the PI and FD at the 8th week (P > 0.05) of the treat-ment sessions across the three groups when compared. It can be con-cluded that stabilization exercises carried out in prone, supine and combination of the two positions were equally effective in managing pain and disability of patients with NSCLBP. However, no position was superior to the other.

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