e-space
Manchester Metropolitan University's Research Repository

    Knowing your ABCs: extending the assessment of stimulus-response (S-R) and cognitive-mediation (C-M) beliefs

    Turner, Martin ORCID logoORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1975-5561, Chadha, Nanaki and Wood, Andrew (2022) Knowing your ABCs: extending the assessment of stimulus-response (S-R) and cognitive-mediation (C-M) beliefs. PLoS One, 17 (6). e0269928-e0269928. ISSN 1932-6203

    [img]
    Preview
    Published Version
    Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

    Download (601kB) | Preview

    Abstract

    Recently, researchers have proposed four superordinate emotion beliefs that supposedly influence emotion regulation and emotion reactivity. Two of these proposed emotion beliefs are captured in the cognitive mediation beliefs questionnaire (CMBQa), namely stimulus-response (S-R) generation beliefs and cognitive mediation (C-M) change beliefs. The remaining two proposed emotion beliefs, C-M generation beliefs and S-R change beliefs, are yet to be operationalised in psychometric form. It is important to validate measurement for all four emotion beliefs in order for them to be used in research and practice. The current paper reports the development and initial validity testing of the CMBQb (studies 1-3), which concerns only C-M generation beliefs and S-R change beliefs, and then tests the four-factor structure of the combined CMBQa (S-R generation, C-M change) and CMBQb (C-M generation, S-R change): the CMBQc (study 4). Some support was found for the four-factor structure of the CMBQc, with factor analyses revealing good fit to the data with a four-factor solution. Also, scores indicating greater C-M generation and change beliefs, and lower S-R generation and change beliefs, were related to more adaptive, and less maladaptive, emotion regulation tendencies. In addition, there was some evidence that greater C-M change beliefs, and lower S-R generation and change belief, were related to better affective and emotion reactivity outcomes. Implications of the CMBQc for research and practice are discussed within the context and emotion regulation science, and cognitive behavioural psychotherapy.

    Impact and Reach

    Statistics

    Activity Overview
    6 month trend
    38Downloads
    6 month trend
    47Hits

    Additional statistics for this dataset are available via IRStats2.

    Altmetric

    Actions (login required)

    View Item View Item