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The effects of vitamin C and E on exercise-induced physiological adaptations: a systematic review and Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Clifford, Tom and Jeffries, Owen and Stevenson, Emma J and Davies, Kelly A Bowden (2019) The effects of vitamin C and E on exercise-induced physiological adaptations: a systematic review and Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 60 (21). pp. 3669-3679. ISSN 0007-9006

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Abstract

We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials examining the effect of vitamin C and/or E on exercise-induced training adaptations. Medline, Embase and SPORTDiscus databases were searched for articles from inception until June 2019. Inclusion criteria was studies in adult humans where vitamin C and/or E had to be consumed alongside a supervised exercise training program of ≥4 weeks. Nine trials were included in the analysis of aerobic exercise adaptations and nine for resistance training (RT) adaptations. Vitamin C and/or E did not attenuate aerobic exercise induced improvements in maximal aerobic capacity (V̇ O2max) (SMD −0.14, 95% CI: −0.43 to 0.15, P = 0.35) or endurance performance (SMD −0.01, 95% CI: −0.38 to 0.36, P = 0.97). There were also no effects of these supplements on lean mass and muscle strength following RT (SMD −0.07, 95% CI: −0.36 to 0.23, P = 0.67) and (SMD −0.15, 95% CI: −0.16 to 0.46, P = 0.35), respectively. There was also no influence of age on any of these outcomes (P > 0.05). These findings suggest that vitamin C and/or E does not inhibit exercise-induced changes in physiological function. Studies with larger sample sizes and adequate power are still required.

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