e-space
Manchester Metropolitan University's Research Repository

“How am I going, coach?” – The effect of augmented feedback during small-sided games on locomotor, physiological, and perceptual responses.

Weakley, J and Read, D and Fullager, H and Ramirez, C and Jones, B and Cummins, C and Sampson, J (2019) “How am I going, coach?” – The effect of augmented feedback during small-sided games on locomotor, physiological, and perceptual responses. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 15 (5). pp. 677-684. ISSN 1555-0265

[img]
Preview

Download (299kB) | Preview

Abstract

Purpose: This study investigated whether providing Global Positioning Systems feedback to players in between bouts of small-sided games (SSGs) can alter locomotor, physiological, and perceptual responses. Methods: Using a reverse counterbalanced design, twenty male university rugby players received either feedback or no-feedback during ‘off-side’ touch rugby SSGs. Eight 5v5, 6 x 4 minute SSGs were played over four days. Teams were assigned to a feedback or no feedback condition (control) each day, with feedback provided during the 2 minute between bout rest interval. Locomotor, heart rate, and differential rating of perceived exertion (dRPE) of breathlessness and leg muscle exertion were measured and analysed using a linear mixed model. Outcomes were reported using effect sizes (ES) and 90% confidence intervals, and then interpreted via magnitude-based decisions. Results: Very likely trivial to unclear differences at all time points were observed in heart rate and dRPE measures. Possibly to very likely trivial effects were observed between-conditions, including total distance (ES= 0.15 [-0.03, 0.34]), high-speed distance (ES= -0.07 [-0.27, 0.13]), and maximal sprint speed (ES= 0.11 [-0.11, 0.34]). All within-bout comparisons showed very likely to unclear differences, apart from possible increases in low-speed distance in bout 2 (ES= 0.23 [0.01, 0.46]) and maximal sprint speed in bout 4 (ES= 0.21 [-0.04, 0.45]). Conclusions: In this study, verbal feedback did not alter locomotor, physiological, or perceptual responses in rugby players during SSGs. This may be due to contextual factors (e.g., opposition) or due to the type (i.e., distance) or low frequency of feedback provided.

Impact and Reach

Statistics

Downloads
Activity Overview
32Downloads
70Hits

Additional statistics for this dataset are available via IRStats2.

Altmetric

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item