e-space
Manchester Metropolitan University's Research Repository

The perceived fairness of work-life balance policies: A UK case study of solo-living managers and professionals without children

Wilkinson, K and Tomlinson, J and Gardiner, J (2018) The perceived fairness of work-life balance policies: A UK case study of solo-living managers and professionals without children. Human Resource Management Journal. ISSN 0954-5395

[img]
Preview

Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (313kB) | Preview

Abstract

The ability to reconcile work and private life is a matter relevant to all employees, though not all may seek “balance.” Research indicates that organisational work–life balance policies and flexible working arrangements often focus on the needs of working parents, with one potential outcome being “family-friendly backlash,” or counterproductive work behaviour from those without caring responsibilities. This paper analyses data from 36 interviews with childless solo-living managers and professionals, exploring perceptions of fairness in relation to these policies. In contrast to previous studies, despite recognising a strong family-care orientation in employer provisions, perceptions of unfair treatment or injustice were not pronounced in most cases, and thus there was little evidence of backlash/counterproductive work behaviour. The paper uses and develops organisational justice theory to explain the findings, emphasising the importance of situating individual justice orientations within perceived organisational policy and wider regulatory contexts. It also emphasises the importance of evaluating fairness of work–life balance policies and flexible working arrangements in relation to other aspects of the employment relationship, notably opportunities for career development and progression.

Impact and Reach

Statistics

Downloads
Activity Overview
172Downloads
242Hits

Additional statistics for this dataset are available via IRStats2.

Altmetric

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item