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Video game playing in children and the effect on self-esteem, understanding of mind and playing in groups

Slymond, Linzi (2013) Video game playing in children and the effect on self-esteem, understanding of mind and playing in groups. Edinburgh Napier University.

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Abstract

Video games and their effect on self-esteem is a topic that has been scrutinised for a long time. There are studies which confirm the existence of an effect and others which deny it. This study aimed to look at the differences between the amount of time children spent playing video games and if more time spent playing served to boost their self-esteem. It also considered the differences in understanding a second order false belief between children who played video games more than once a week and those who did not. The study was conducted over a one-month period, with nine participants at a local After School club. The study found no significant difference between the amount of time spent playing video games and self-esteem, the amount of time spent playing video games and understanding a second order false belief, and age and self-esteem. The study did find a significant difference in behaviour and speech when children were playing in groups depending on how often the children played video games. The results of the study are discussed in the terms of the implications for current and future research, the strengths and weaknesses of the current study, and the contribution to the field of video game playing and self-esteem. Finally, the study proposes recommendations for future research and offers conclusions.

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