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“It's just like a needle going into my hip, basically all of the time”. The experiences and perceptions of patients with Greater Trochanteric Pain syndrome in the UK National Health Service

Stephens, Gareth and O'Neill, Seth and Mottershead, Claire and Hawthorn, Catrin and Yeowell, Gillian and Littlewood, Chris (2020) “It's just like a needle going into my hip, basically all of the time”. The experiences and perceptions of patients with Greater Trochanteric Pain syndrome in the UK National Health Service. Musculoskeletal Science and Practice. p. 102175. ISSN 2468-7812

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Abstract

Background: Greater Trochanteric Pain syndrome (GTPS) is a condition causing lateral hip pain, which can be both persistent and debilitating. Data suggests that NHS patients with GTPS often have complex presentations with greater risk of developing persistent pain. No research to date has looked to understand the lived experience of patients with GTPS. Objectives: This data may help inform a programme of intervention development for testing in a future randomised controlled trial. Hence, this qualitative study aimed to provide insight into the experiences and perceptions of patients suffering with GTPS. Design: Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews. Methods: Ten patients diagnosed with GTPS in consultant-led clinic at one NHS Hospital. Patients were identified from the physiotherapy waiting list and approached via a postal letter. Once informed consent was gained, semistructured telephone interviews were conducted, transcribed verbatim and analysed using the Framework Method. Results: Data were analysed with reference to five pre-determined themes (1) living with persistent pain; (2) understanding the problem and pain; (3) experiences of previous treatment; (4) beliefs about activity and exercise; (5) the future. Conclusion: The participants with GTPS, interviewed in this study commonly suffered from debilitating pain, affecting them during activity and at rest. They were confused about the diagnoses they were given and the meaning of their pain in relation to activity. Furthermore, participants were often either uncertain or pessimistic about their potential to recover

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