e-space
Manchester Metropolitan University's Research Repository

Effects of interpersonal violence-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on mother and child diurnal cortisol rhythm and cortisol reactivity to a laboratory stressor involving separation

Cordero Campaña, MI and Moser, DA and Manini, A and Suardi, F and Sancho Rossignol, A and Torrisi, R and Rossier, MF and Ansermet, F and Dayer, AG and Rusconi Serpa, S and Schechter, DS (2017) Effects of interpersonal violence-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on mother and child diurnal cortisol rhythm and cortisol reactivity to a laboratory stressor involving separation. Hormones and Behavior. ISSN 0018-506X (In Press)

[img]
Preview

Download (691kB) | Preview

Abstract

Women who have experienced interpersonal violence (IPV) are at a higher risk to develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), with dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and impaired social behavior. Previously, we had reported impaired maternal sensitivity and increased difficulty in identifying emotions (i.e. alexithymia) among IPV-PTSD mothers. One of the aims of the present study was to examine maternal IPV-PTSD salivary cortisol levels diurnally and reactive to their child’s distress in relation to maternal alexithymia. Given that mother-child interaction during infancy and early childhood has important long-term consequences on the stress response system, toddlers’ cortisol levels were assessed during the day and in response to a laboratory stressor. Mothers collected their own and their 12-48 month-old toddlers’ salivary samples at home three times: 30 min after waking up, between 2-3 pm and at bedtime. Moreover, mother-child dyads articipated in a 120-min laboratory session, consisting of 3 phases: baseline, stress situation (involving mother-child separation and exposure to novelty) and a 60-min regulation phase. Compared to non-PTSD controls, IPV-PTSD mothers -but not their toddlers-, had lower morning cortisol and higher bedtime cortisol levels. As expected, IPV-PTSD mothers and their children showed blunted cortisol reactivity to the laboratory stressor. Maternal cortisol levels were negatively correlated to difficulty in identifying emotions. Our data highlights PTSDIPV-related alterations in the HPA system and its relevance to maternal behavior. Toddlers of IPV-PTSD mothers also showed an altered pattern of cortisol reactivity to stress that potentially may predispose them to later psychological disorders.

Impact and Reach

Statistics

Downloads
Activity Overview
214Downloads
103Hits

Additional statistics for this dataset are available via IRStats2.

Altmetric

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item