e-space
Manchester Metropolitan University's Research Repository

Human limb skeletal muscle wasting and architectural remodeling during five to ten days intubation and ventilation in critical care - an observational study using ultrasound

Turton, P and Hay, R and Taylor, J and McPhee, J and Welters, I (2016) Human limb skeletal muscle wasting and architectural remodeling during five to ten days intubation and ventilation in critical care - an observational study using ultrasound. BMC Anesthesiology, 16 (119). ISSN 1471-2253

[img]
Preview

Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

© 2016 The Author(s).Background: Critically ill patients frequently suffer muscle weakness whilst in critical care. Ultrasound can reliably track loss of muscle size, but also quantifies the arrangement of the muscle fascicles, known as the muscle architecture. We sought to measure both pennation angle and fascicle length, as well as tracking changes in muscle thickness in a population of critically ill patients. Methods: On days 1, 5 and 10 after admission to critical care, muscle thickness was measured in ventilated critically ill patients using bedside ultrasound. Elbow flexor compartment, medial head of gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis muscle were investigated. In the lower limb, we determined the pennation angle to derive the fascicle length. Results: We recruited and scanned 22 patients on day 1 after admission to critical care, 16 were re-scanned on day 5 and 9 on day 10. We found no changes to the size of the elbow flexor compartment over 10days of admission. In the gastrocnemius, there were no significant changes to muscle thickness or pennation angle over 5 or 10days. In the vastus lateralis, we found significant losses in both muscle thickness and pennation angle on day 5, but found that fascicle length is unchanged. Loss of muscle on day 5 was related to decreases in pennation angle. In both lower limb muscles, a positive relationship was observed between the pennation angle on day 1, and the percentage of angle lost by days 5 and 10. Discussion: Muscle loss in critically ill patients preferentially affects the lower limb, possibly due to the lower limb becoming prone to disuse atrophy. Muscle architecture of the thigh changes in the first 5days of admission, in particular, we have demonstrated a correlation between muscle thickness and pennation angle. It is hypothesised that weakness in the lower limb occurs through loss of force generation via a reduced pennation angle. Conclusion: Using ultrasound, we have been able to demonstrate that muscle thickness and architecture of vastus lateralisundergo rapid changes during the early phase of admission to a critical care environment.

Impact and Reach

Statistics

Downloads
Activity Overview
93Downloads
181Hits

Additional statistics for this dataset are available via IRStats2.

Altmetric

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item